Tag Archives: Story Ideas

The Most Inspiring Blog Post About Writing You’ll Ever Read

Today’s post is courtesy of Kate Krake’s blog: The Write Turn

I am hopeful that Kate Krake’s post might introduce you to some fine writing blogs that you may have missed, and that the links and musings about these stand-out (whether you agree with them or not) blog posts about the craft of writing, might encourage and inspire you to continue writing for just a little bit longer today…

Cheers!
Lauren Delaney
Love changes everything. tm

 

The Most Inspiring Blog Post About Writing You’ll Ever Read

by Kate Krake

As a writer who writes and a writer who writes about writing, I read a lot about writing.
Make sense? Writing blog posts, books, email newsletters, books, articles – anything I can get, I’ll read it. Sometimes I’m trawling for ideas for my own articles, other times I’m hungry for inspiration for my work or in need of advice on how to nut out a particular writing problem that’s causing me grief.

Sometimes I find the answer and am completely blown away with inspiration and the way forward is clear and simple. Sometimes it doesn’t work like that at all. Sometimes you’re just not in the right mood to be receptive to certain advice. Other times the advice might suck. Other times it could have something to do with the weather.

It’s that first group I want to focus on today. In this post, I’ve gathered up a selection of 5 of the most inspirational articles on writing I’ve ever found. Some are new, some are old but all of them in some way have given me pause and, I think, helped me become a better writer.

There’s a bit of a variation in these five. You’ll find advice for bloggers, advice for fiction writers, advice for publishing, advice on creativity, advice that just keeps your pen moving to the next word when you feel as though you can’t possible write anything else ever again and would rather give up on the whole game and go work in a grocery store. We’ve all been there.

Write Epic Shit

Corbett Barr. Think Traffic.
Write Epic Shit has become a manifesto for content writers, and can be applied to all kinds of writing and creating and generally everything you do.

The Lesson: Strive to create BIG and IMPORTANT things rather than churning out a bunch of mediocre stuff that’s no different to anything anyone else is doing. That’s the stuff that’s going to matter most to you, to your readers and that’s the stuff that’s going to get your writing noticed.

Expertise vs. Humility – A Writer’s Battle Royale?

Taylor Jacobson. Write to Done.
This post blipped onto my radar recently and after reading it, I couldn’t shake its ideas for a long time. It’s particularly relevant to bloggers and non-fiction writers, asking how do you strike the balance between writing with authority to give advice and help people, and resist coming across like an know it all tosser?

The Lesson: Write from the authority of your own experience and learning and show your own weaknesses and shortcomings.

Make More Art: Interview with Seth Godin

Seth Godin, interviewed by Joe Bunting. The Write Practice.
Seth Godin. That’s about all you need to know to understand that is is going to be a pretty inspiring post on how to get remarkable stuff done and noticed. I could have added just about anything written by Seth Godin to this list and had the same effect, but I went with this one as it’s specifically put together as advice for writers. Anything you write, anything you work on at all this interview is going to inspire you. Get a pen ready.

The Lesson: Make Art. Get over what anyone else thinks and do it. Keep doing it.

How Do I Write What The Audience Wants To Read?

Chuck Wendig. Terrible Minds.
Chuck Wendig is an author and blogger who’s never afraid to mince words and tell it like it is. In this post he talks about why it’s essentially a waste of time to attempt to write your novel aimed at a particular market. It’s funny, it’s irreverent, it’s inspiring. Read it now.

The Lesson:
Forget the market. Writing for a market is not writing for yourself and by the time you’re ready to publish, the market will probably have changed anyway.

Pep Talk by Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman. National Novel Writing Month.
I had this printed out and pinned up on my wall for a long time (why did I take it down? I moved house recently and haven’t put it back up yet). Writer and creative extraordinaire, Neil Gaiman tells us a very human story (he is a super human, after all) about the doubt a writer can suffer when working through their manuscript; that feeling you get half way through when it seems like everything is crap and the ever present temptation to chuck it all away and start on something new and fresh and BETTER. More importantly, he tell you how to get over it.

The Lesson: Find the next word. Write it down. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.

I hope you get as much out of these as I did and continue to do. Like any bit of writing advice, feel free to take and use any of these as you need or ignore it as hackneyed nonsense and get on with it.

Got a particularly inspirational article about writing you’d like to share? Link to it here and let’s all get something out of it!

That post was courtesy of Kate Krake’s blog: The Write Turn 

I am hopeful that it might introduce you to some fine writing blogs that you may have missed, and that the links and musings about these stand-out (whether you agree with them or not) blog posts about the craft of writing, might encourage and inspire you to continue writing for just a little bit longer today…

Cheers! Lauren Delaney     

Love changes everything. tm